Curriculum as Numeracy

Thinking back to my k through 12 schooling, I do believe discriminatory and oppressive practices in my math/science classes were obvious. One example that strikes my mind right away takes me back to grade 7 during a math lesson. While many students could not understand how to complete this specific math problem on the board, I than tried it a different way and showed my classmates how to do it. Although my way also got the correct answer, the teacher was not to happy about this. She wanted us to do it the way she had planned, which is understandable but at the same time she did not take into account that people learn and think in many different ways. Another example would be in my grade 11 chemistry class. I do not remember a single lesson that incorporated indigenous teachings into the different topics, even where indigenous knowledge would be extremely advantageous such as in organic chemistry. I think learning about indigenous plants alongside organic chemistry puts real life into what students are learning in the classroom. I think experiences such as the ones I have are the ones that can surely impact the educational paths of many students. 

         While Reading the Poirier article I learned that there are many ways that Inuit mathematics challenge the ideas that occur in today’s westerns schools. One of these practices were having the students learn orally and through story telling while the Eurocentric way would be using pen, paper and books. Another practice of the Inuit peoples is finding different ways to explain topics such as in religion or in science. the ways of learning present here are example that allows students to. Connect themselves with the environment, traditions, and with others as well. 

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